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Karadeniz Turu

05 Temmuz 2017
117 kez görüntülendi
Karadeniz Turu
Trabzon is a city in the nothern part of Turkey . It has a lot of mountains , beautiful lakes and naturel forests.But the most beautiful places are Sumela Monastery which is built in a mountain at the altitude of 1300m in the 4th century ;Altındere natinal park (golden valley) ;Zigana mountain which has a spectacular views; and Uzungöl lake where nature is charming Uzungöl (English: Long Lake) is a lake situated to the south of the city of Trabzon, in the Çaykara district of Trabzon Province, Turkey. Uzungöl is also the name of the village on the lake’s coast. Over the years, the picturesque lake, its village and the surrounding valley have become popular tourist attractions. The lake is at a distance of 99 km from Trabzon’s city center, and 19 km from Çaykara’s district center. It was formed by alandslide, which transformed the stream bed into a narural dam, in the valley of the Haldizen Stream

 

Uzungöl (English: Long Lake) is a lake situated to the south of the city of Trabzon, in the Çaykara district of Trabzon Province, Turkey. Uzungöl is also the name of the village on the lake’s coast. Over the years, the picturesque lake, its village and the surrounding valley have become popular tourist attractions. The lake is at a distance of 99 km from Trabzon’s city center, and 19 km from Çaykara’s district center. It was formed by alandslide, which transformed the stream bed into a narural dam, in the valley of the Haldizen Stream

The area is most famous for its natural beauty. Located in a valley between high rising mountains the lake and village at first appear inaccessible. The surrounding greenery of the mountain forests and fog occasionally enveloping the lake at night, also add to the scenery.

The tourist boom of the recent years has attracted investors, who opened a number of hotels, restaurants, and souvenir shops in the village. The transport infrastructure has also been greatly improved. In 2008, the government built a concrete barrier along the lake’s shoreline, so that its waves would not wet the coastal roads around it. This has triggered protests by the locals, as well as ecologists concerned with environmental damage, who stated that it has turned the lake into a giant artificial pool.

The Sümela Monastery (Turkish: Sümela Manastırı, Greek: Μονή Παναγίας Σουμελά), is a Greek Orthodox monastery dedicated to the Virgin Mary ( Panagia, meaning “All Holy” in Greek) at Melá mountain, in the region of Maçka in the Trabzon Province of modern Turkey. Nestled in a steep cliff at an altitude of about 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) facing the Altındere valley, it is a site of great historical and cultural significance, as well as a major tourist attraction of Altındere National Park.

The monastery was founded in 386 AD during the reign of the Emperor Theodosius (375 – 395), Legend has it that two priests undertook its creation after discovering a miraculous icon of the Virgin Mary in a cave on the mountain.

During its long history, the monastery fell into ruin several times and was restored by various emperors. During the 6th century, it was restored and enlarged by General Belisarius at the behest of Justinian

It reached its present form in the 13th century after gaining prominence during the reign of Alexios III (1349 – 1390) of the Komenian Empire of Trebizond, established in 1204. At that time, the monastery was granted an amount annually from imperial funds. During the time of Manuel IIII, son of Alexius III, and during the reigns of subsequent princes, Sümela gained further wealth from imperial grants. Following the conquest by the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II in 1461, it was granted the sultan’s protection and given rights and privileges that were renewed by following sultans. The monastery remained a popular destination for monks and travelers through the years.

In 1682 and for a few decades, the monastery housed the Phrontisterion of Trapezous, a well-known Greek educational institution of the region.[2

The monastery was seized by the Russian Empire during the 1916-18 occupation of Trabzon.

The site was abandoned in 1923, following forced population exchanges betweenGreece and Turkey. The departing monks were not allowed to take any property with them, so they buried Sumela’s famous icon under the floor of the monastery’s St. Barbara chapel. In 1930, a monk secretly returned to Sumela and retrieved the icon, transferring it to the new Panaqia Soumela Monastery, on the slopes of Mount Vermion, near the town ofNausa, in Macedonia, Greece.

Today the monastery’s primary function is as a tourist attraction. It overlooks forests and streams, making it extremely popular for its aesthetic attraction as well as for its cultural and religious significance.

As of 2012, the Turkish government is funding restoration work, and the monastery is enjoying a revival in pilgrimage from Greece and Russia.

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